Invited Speakers

Invited Tutorial Speakers

John Verdon , Office of the Chief Scientist at Defence Research and Development Canada, Canada
Russell Eberhart, CTO at Phoenix Data Corporation, USA


Invited Speakers

Russell Eberhart

Particle Swarm: From Cornfield Vectors to Cognitive Radio

Particle swarm optimization has evolved from modeling social systems to applications for security and defense. Engineering applications for estimating battery state of charge and optimizing container port yard planning were among early successes. Applications to the fields of extended analog computing and biomedical engineering are ongoing. A recent focus has emerged in the fields of security and defense applications. Included are developments in unmanned vehicle mission planning optimization, intelligent traffic barrier networks, and resource allocation optimization for cognitive radio.

Biography

Russell C. Eberhart is the CTO of Phoenix Data Corporation, Indianapolis, Indiana. He is also Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). He was formerly Vice President and CTO of Computelligence, LLC. He received his Ph.D. from Kansas State University in electrical engineering. He is co-editor of a book on neural networks (1991), and co-author of Computational Intelligence PC Tools, published in 1996 by Academic Press. He is co-author of a book with Jim Kennedy and Yuhui Shi entitled Swarm Intelligence, published by Morgan Kaufmann in 2001. He is the co-author, with Yuhui Shi, of a book entitled Computational Intelligence: Concepts to Implementations, published in August 2007 by Morgan Kaufmann/Elsevier. He was awarded the IEEE Third Millenium Medal. In January 2001, he became a Fellow of the IEEE. He was elected a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering in 2002. He has been awarded four U. S. Patents, and is co-inventor for another pending patent. He has done ground-breaking work in applying swarm intelligence to human tremor analysis, sleep disorders medicine, evolutionary analog computing, logistics, spectrum warfare, and optimization of resource allocation.

Emil Petriu

Symbiotic Human-Instrument Environment Perception

The presentation will discuss a coherent framework for the development of a symbiotic human-instrument multi-sensor system for multimodal environment and situation assessment applications.

Such a symbiotic multi-sensor system will not only use humans as explicit, usually fuzzy, sensors agents, but will also use human and animal behaviour, and vegetation status as implicit contextual indicators.
Human-like computational intelligence techniques are used for the multi-sensor fusion and context–based interpretation of the multimodal sensor data.

Biography:

Dr. Emil M. Petriu is a Professor and University Research Chair in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. His research interests include biology-inspired robot sensing and soft computing. During his career he has published more than 300 technical papers, authored two books, edited other two books, and received two patents.

He is a Fellow of IEEE, Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering, and Fellow of the Engineering Institute of Canada. He is a co-recipient of the 2003 IEEE’s Donald G. Fink Prize Paper Award and a received the 2003 IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Society Technical Award and the 2009 IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Society Distinguished Service Award.

James Kraft

Future Concepts for Maritime Domain Awareness

Surveillance of the global maritime domain is an extremely challenging role for maritime nations to undertake. The vast distances that extend well beyond line of sight, paucity of surveillance resources, difficult communication conditions and lack of automated fusion systems makes it impossible for nations to achieve complete maritime domain awareness in the approaches to their shores. Considering the significant capacity for damage that large ships could inflict, there is a compelling business case for developing an integrated maritime domain awareness system-of-systems that features multi-dimensional sensors from the sea, sub-surface, land, air and space, a global system of communications bearers and an intelligent data fusion and dissemination system. This presentation discusses the components of a future maritime domain awareness system-of-systems and discusses how they should be integrated to better support the maritime commanders' decision making processes.

Biography:

James Kraft is a senior military analyst specializing in intelligence and surveillance. He is the owner and principle consultant of James Kraft Consulting Inc., an Ottawa based consulting firm that works extensively with companies and government departments engaged in defence and security. James was a naval officer with the Canadian Navy from 1983 to 2003 when he retired to establish JKC Inc. Early in his naval career, James specialized in navigation and was the navigating officer in both destroyer and mine sweeper class warships. Subsequently, he became involved in Command and Control Information Systems and was posted to the Naval Operations School Tactics and Team Training group to teach and assess command and control tactics. In 1996, James was assigned to an exchange position with the Royal Navy where he performed the duties of Operational Research Analysis team lead in the Maritime Warfare Centre in Portsdown, UK. Returning to Canada in 1999, James was posted to the Director Maritime Requirements Sea to develop maritime surveillance and intelligence systems. In 2002, he took on the challenge of establishing the first space based maritime satellite surveillance.

Since 2003, James Kraft has been building a consulting practice centred on Command Control Computing Communications Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) with a focus on the maritime domain. In this specialty, James has provided subject matter expertise to many clients including the Director General Space, Defence Research and Development Canada, Assistant Deputy Minister (Information Management), the Canadian Space Agency, Canadian Coast Guard and other organizations.

James has a Masters of Business Administration degree, a Masters of Science in Project Management degree and a Bachelor degree in psychology and economics.


Invited Tutorial Speakers

John Verdon

The Wealth of People – From the Management of Knowledge to the Governance of Social Computing and the Programmable Organization

We are in the midst of an exponential evolution in communication and computational technologies that are forming a digital environment. This environment will make conversation and collaboration much more dominant in how we generate, discover, capture, analyze, distil, exapt, validate and apply tacit individual and collective knowledge and how we should structure the work environment. The digital environment is making an abundance of resources and relationships easily accessible challenging our concepts of learning including how we teach, coach, and credentialize knowing. Increasingly people expect to be able to work, share, and learn where and when they want or need to. It is revolutionizing the way that information can be synthesised, stored, shared and retrieved. For organizations seeking to thrive in this environment that also includes accelerating change, interdependence and complexity - agility and speed are vital.

The tutorial examines the implications of hyper-connectivity associated with the digital environment and social media and argues that the purpose of traditional organizational architecture aimed at minimizing ‘transaction costs’ must be re-evaluated. The traditional approach to organization human/collective efforts may now impose higher transactions cost than other structures mediated through digital networks.

A theory of the digital environment is offered, that sees it as a disruption of the industrial economy and the structure of its organizations by enabling a progression into an era of almost costless hyper-connectivity enabling a hyper-division-of-labour with a corresponding hyper-exchange producing a requisite hyper-knowledge-metabolism. The consequence that this entails is that organizations must become programmable systems to harness the power of human capital in the digital environment.

The concept of hyperspecialization relates to a type of ‘cloud-labour’ approach or what has been called social computing. The ability to harness agile self-organized hyperspecialization will require some institutional innovation related to the governance of knowledge. A concept of a programmable organization enables a much richer networked ecosystem of talent and abilities that can be recombined in agile responsive ways to enable organizational, institutional, social, scientific and technological innovation enabling better flows and use of people’s knowledge.

Keeping human efforts aligned, while simultaneously promoting agility and innovation will require more types of collaboration in increasingly complex environments. To do this is a more challenging task than one more ‘reengineering’ of the organizational structure. The challenge will be to manage and steward the conditions that shape the communicative and working relationships that enable people to engage in conversations and collaboration as they are needed and to search and find information that they require is the challenge facing organizations today. It is a complex problem of culture and structure. The computational paradigm provides a better frame with which to approach the design of work and related institutional, and governance frameworks. In essence, the structures and cultures of 21st century organizations will have to be programmable.
The tutorial will also explore the social construction of knowledge that is the result of the complex social interactions. The most valuable and hardest to develop knowledge is tacit (both individual and collective), and cannot be managed directly, nor can it be captured in explicable forms. Although it lives in the minds of people and in the organizational culture, it can be generated and harnessed through appropriate leveraging of the digital environment.

If organizations are going to be able to fully leverage the emerging digital environment, to fully develop the potential of flowing tacit knowledge and know-how and harness the power of social computing, they will require new ways to design how works is accomplished. To do this will require a governance framework enabling new and more dynamically programmable organizational architectures to foster greater subsidiarity and a more integrated, agile environment. Most important, a programmable architecture is necessary for tacit individual and collective knowledge to be more efficiently and effectively generated, discovered, captured, analyzed, distilled, exapted, exchanged, validated and applied.
If Social Media (the digital environment) is the Medium – Then Social Computing is the Message
Entailing That Organizations Become Programmable Complex Adaptive Systems

Thus this tutorial is a challenge to the computational intelligence symposium to expand the paradigm and consider the application of computational intelligence to organizational architectures as well as social and cultural institutions.

Biography:

John is researcher with a rich and broad background in theoretical and applied social science research. Expertise in foresight research, social media & related technologies (digital environment), complexity sciences, knowledge management, co-operative & collaborative communities and strategic human resource analysis related to emerging cognitive, biological and nano-technologies and their potential impact on human and social performance.
Selected Professional activities include:

Russell Eberhart

Technology Transition in Lean Fiscal Times

Bridging what is called the “technology valley of death” between applied research and manufacturing/implementation, always a challenge, has become an even more difficult hurdle given the current economic climate. Traditionally, technology transition has been viewed as occurring primarily between basic and applied research done by academia and product/system adoption by government/industry. It has also been primarily viewed at a national level. Today, however, this technology valley of death is increasingly relevant to intra-government and intra-corporate technology development pathways, exacerbating the challenges faced by academia. Given our global economy, it also has significant international implications. The bottom line is that far too many potentially game-changing developments are lost for lack of support. This tutorial reviews approaches to resolve this challenge, some more successful than others.

Biography:

Russell C. Eberhart is the CTO of Phoenix Data Corporation, Indianapolis, Indiana. He is also Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). He was formerly Vice President and CTO of Computelligence, LLC. He received his Ph.D. from Kansas State University in electrical engineering. He is co-editor of a book on neural networks (1991), and co-author of Computational Intelligence PC Tools, published in 1996 by Academic Press. He is co-author of a book with Jim Kennedy and Yuhui Shi entitled Swarm Intelligence, published by Morgan Kaufmann in 2001. He is the co-author, with Yuhui Shi, of a book entitled Computational Intelligence: Concepts to Implementations, published in August 2007 by Morgan Kaufmann/Elsevier. He was awarded the IEEE Third Millenium Medal. In January 2001, he became a Fellow of the IEEE. He was elected a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering in 2002. He has been awarded four U. S. Patents, and is co-inventor for another pending patent. He has done ground-breaking work in applying swarm intelligence to human tremor analysis, sleep disorders medicine, evolutionary analog computing, logistics, spectrum warfare, and optimization of resource allocation.